“The Intimate Event” Showcase ~ Presented By JB Lighting Production ~ Land and Sea Event Planning

Please register for this complimentary showcase at www.theintimateevent.eventbrite.com

Company Launch at Montclair Museum of Art.

Company Launch at Montclair Museum of Art.

 

Let’s Eat Cake!

Let’s Eat Cake

Wedding cakes can certainly range in size, from a small cake that feeds ten people, to a very large cake that will feed hundreds, all depending on the wedding. Modern pastry chefs and cake designers use various ingredients and tools to create a cake that will reflect the personalities of the couple. Marzipan, fondant, gum paste, butter cream  and chocolate are among some of the more popular ingredients used. Along with ranging in size and components, cakes range in price. Cakes are usually priced on a per-person, or per-slice, basis.  Prices usually range from a few dollars to a few hundred dollars per-person or slice, depending on the Pastry Chef hired to make the cake. Wedding cakes and cake decorating in general have become a certain pop culture symbol in western society; many TV shows like Cake Boss or Amazing Wedding Cakes have become very common and are trending in today’s popular culture.
The contemporary wedding cake has grown out of many traditions. One of the first traditions began in Ancient Rome where bread was broken over the bride’s head to bring good fortune to the couple. In Medieval England cakes were stacked as high as possible for the bride and groom to kiss over, if they successfully kissed over the stack they were guaranteed a prosperous life together. From this the Croquembouche was created. The myth behind this cake tells that a Pastry chef, visiting Medieval England, witnessed their tradition of piling sweet rolls between the bride and groom which they would attempt to kiss over without knocking them all down. The pastry chef then went back to France and piled sweet rolls up into a tower to make the first Croquembouche. The modern croquembouche is still very popular in France however it is common to place the croquembouche tower on a bed of cake and make it one of the top tiers of the wedding cake. This traditional French wedding cake is built from Profiteroles and given a halo of spun sugar.  Traditionally the bride would place a ring inside the couple’s portion of the cake to symbolize the acceptance of the proposal.
During the mid-17th century to the beginning of the 19th century, the “bride’s pie” was served at most weddings. Guests were expected to have a piece out of politeness; it was considered very rude and bad luck not to eat the bride’s pie. One of the traditions of bride’s pie was to place a glass ring in the middle of the dessert and the maiden who found it would be the next to marry, similar to the modern tradition of catching the Flower bouquet. Bride’s pie eventually developed into the bride’s cake. At this point the dessert was no longer in the form of a pie and was sweeter than its predecessor.  The bride cake was traditionally a plum or fruit cake, the myth that eating the pie would bring good luck was still common but the glass ring slowly died out and the catching of the flower bouquet took that meaning.
The action of throwing the bouquet has its roots in the Ancient Greek myth of the Apple of Discord. Fruit cakes were a sign of fertility and prosperity which helped them gain popularity because all married men wanted to have plenty of children. The bride’s cake eventually transformed into the modern wedding cake that we know today.  In the 17th century, two cakes were made, one for the bride and one for the groom. The groom’s cake eventually died out and the bride’s cake turned into the main cake for the event. When the two cakes were served together, the groom’s cake was typically the darker colored, rich fruit cake and generally much smaller than the bride’s cake. The bride’s cake was usually a simple pound cake with white icing because white was a sign of virginity and purity. In the early 19th century, when the bride’s cakes were becoming more popular, sugar was coincidentally becoming easier to obtain. The more refined and whiter sugars were still very expensive therefore only the wealthy families could afford to have a very pure white frosting; this showed the wealth and the social status of the family. When Queen Victoria used white icing on her cake it gained a new title, royal icing.  You just have to wonder where these traditions came from. Do you know what inspired the traditional staples of Weddings today?

2012 Wedding Trends: A Year in Review

We are looking back at 2012 Wedding Trends: A Year in Review

Hey Beautiful People!

As we approach the end of 2012, it’s time to reflect and revisit some of the beautiful designs we’ve experienced this past year. From wedding gowns,  to eclectic table design, we’re looking back at some pretty amazing weddings.  Join us on this journey and let these terrific visuals stimulate you for YOUR next event!!!

A beautiful, sexy shoe in your favorite color under your gown? We saw that in 2012 and we definitely want to see it again in 2013. That trend is a keeper!

Couples found some unique ways to set up their wedding ceremonies and their guests loved it!!

Source: bellethemagazine.com via Land and Sea Event Planning on Pinterest

Chair design played an important role in the overall decor for the recetio.Source: stylemepretty.com via Land and Sea Event Planning on Pinterest

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Who knew that blush pink would be the breakout color for wedding gowns in 2012? If you missed it, check out Jessica Biel’s wedding dress!

 

Some brides left the traditional veils behind and opted for a simple, yet beautiful headpiece accessory.

 

Barnyard weddings made a big splash for 2012–we expect to see more of these in 2013!

Mason jars were at almost every outdoor wedding…have we seen the last of them? Only time will tell!

 

We’ve seen a HUGE push for suspended centerpieces. Check out these hanging branches flanked by table numbers. And whatever you do, don’t forget to include candles….everywhere. We believe there can never be too many….LOVE!

 

Clean, modern, minimal…our city brides LOVE this!

Lounge furniture showed up at a bunch of weddings – and we never saw the same design twice! Grab some custom pillows with your monogram and don’t forget to use LEDs to light up the furniture! POW!

 

Brides want different, so they are considering necklines other than strapless…we are definitely going to see some lovely necklines in lace, off-the-shoulder, spaghetti straps, one-shoulder, and much more! And the back of the dress will become more of a focal point for the more daring brides…we can’t wait to see it all in 2013!

The sweetheart table may be replaced by take a back seat to the old-school head table or dais, which is making  a comeback. We’ll be designing a few, but with a modern twist. For those that do have the sweetheart table, make sure it’s a show-stopper like this one! 

 

Burlap was big in 2012…and will continue to be present in 2013.

Custom signs for the outdoor wedding is one of the fun elements we love! 

 

Buffet vs. Sit Down vs. Stations vs. Cocktail Reception….couples pushed the envelope to entice their guests with eclectic food service at their weddings. Whatever you decide, make it an engaging, yet delicious experience. Food trucks anyone?

Color Palette Inspiration: Grey and Yellow

Grey and Yellow are a beautifully calming combination for weddings.

Just check out these gorgeous wedding photos – you can’t resist it!

Tell us what you think!! We’d love to hear from you!

This suit is VERY sexy!

The perfect shade of grey for your bridesmaids dress!

White shoes POP against the grey color palette!!

Don’t forget the wedding accessories!

Wedding Planning Tip: Decide what you MUST HAVE…then go get it!

Every bride knows what’s most important to them for their wedding day. It could be the perfect dress, or the perfect centerpiece, or maybe they’ve always dreamed of getting married on the beach or with NYC as the perfect backdrop.

If you’re on a budget for your wedding, there are ways to get what’s most important to you. The first step is to make a two lists. The first list is your “must have” list….the second list is your “wish list”. If you’re a fashionista, start shopping for your dress early and decide on a dress that will make you feel nothing less than a supermodel. You may not be able to afford that Vera Wang gown, but you can certainly find something pretty darn close in style and fit. You’d be very surprised at the really lovely array of gowns available for a fraction of the cost. The most important thing here is to realize that on this day, your wedding day, you want to look and feel the best ever…so you need to put the work in to realize this dream. The way you feel in your dress, hair and makeup, will exude through every picture you take.

If you’re into clean lines and modern decor, you can certainly save some decent bucks on your centerpieces. Once you’ve decided on your venue, think about the architecture and decor of the room in its raw state. What can you add to the tables to compliment the room, yet still keep your minimalistic sense of style?Perhaps candles should be the focal point on your tables, especially if the dinner is being served at sunset or later. You can still add some flowers to the table if you wish, it just doesn’t need to be over the top, if that’s not your style. Maybe clusters of candles and low flowers on the table will achieve the look you want. For a vintage wedding, simple florals in mason jars or tea/coffee cans are very economical.

Most couples want to give their guests a wonderful gift, but they don’t want to spend a ton on wedding favors. The cutest favors tie in with your theme or wedding colors. You can be most economical when your favors are also used as escort cards. Killing two birds with one stone will definitely cut down on your expenses.

Have you found the perfect venue, but it’s out of your budget? Speak to the salesperson at the venue and ask about “value dates” or off-season pricing? Most venues offer a discounted rate if you marry outside of prime wedding season. If you’re okay with a Friday night wedding, that might get you a discount as well. Some folks might balk at a February or March wedding, thinking yikes — it’s not warm out, but if your venue is an indoor venue and you won’t planning on utilizing the outside, that won’t really matter, when you think about it. It’s the inside of the venue that you’re attracted to and the room is what’s most important. That room won’t change whether it’s Winter, Spring, Summer, or Fall. For those 5-6 hours that you’re there, you and your guests won’t give a hoot about what’s going on outside — and you’ll have your dream venue without breaking the bank.

Your rehearsal dinner doesn’t have to compete with your wedding reception. No need for stuffy, formal restaurants and cuisine. More and more engaged couples are hosting the rehearsal dinner at their parents’ home or a friend’s home that can accommodate the group. This is my favorite type of rehearsal dinner because it’s a chance for your closest family and the bridal party to get together the night before the wedding in a relaxed atmosphere. Set the table beautifully, but simply. Serve easy comfort food.Go light on the alcohol consumption and end the night early enough so that everyone (especially the bride and groom) can be well rested for the next day’s main event.

I truly believe that every bride can have a wedding day that is beautiful and filled with gorgeous elements. It’s all in how you plan. We know this because…that’s what we do!

Happy Planning!

Do you have your OWN Wedding Planner?

We are proud to present our first guest blogger – Founder and owner of Sage and Time Designs, M. Shannon Hernandez. Shannon discusses her own perspective of hiring a wedding planner. 

Two years ago, I was married on a cruise ship, departing from Tampa Bay, Florida.  My husband and I desired a destination wedding for many reasons.  First, our friends and family were scattered all over the United States, and having them travel to New York City was going to be very expensive when lodging and flights were taken into consideration.  Second, we wanted a destination wedding somewhere warm, as we were getting married on February 14th, and that is typically a snowy, brutal season in NYC!  Finally, we both wanted to spend quality time with the people we loved so much (We were at sea for 7 days.) and not feel rushed during the typical 3 or 4 hour reception.

One of the most appealing aspects of a destination wedding for me was knowing that I would have the assistance of a wedding planner on the cruise ship!  It was exciting and relaxing to know that all the details would be handled for me, from miles away, right down until the time of the reception.  While I love to plan projects from start to finish, I was looking forward to the luxury of having someone else take care of all the details for our wedding.

We arrived in Tampa Bay two days early and our guests began trickling into the hotel we had reserved.  There was so much excitement in the air, and I remember squealing with delight when each new guest knocked on our door to let us know of their safe arrival.  The first night we all went out on the town, had a few drinks, and danced to Cuban music, just enjoying the company of each other.  The next day, in the afternoon, my mother and I went to a salon to get our nails done, and enjoy some mother-daughter time.  As the final layer of polish was being applied to my toes, the cell phone rang.  It was the ship’s wedding planner, and everything was about to change.

I was informed that the ship was stuck at sea and that its return to port would be delayed by at least 5 hours.  We were to be married the next day at 1PM, but the time had now tentatively been moved to 7 PM.  She informed me that she would be in contact when and if anything changed.  At first, I must be honest–I was not upset.  I was a little shocked, but not upset.  However, as I relayed the information to my mom, a couple of things “hit” me:

1.  Several of our guests (one being the best man!!) had flights that were leaving at 6 PM the next day, as they had to get back home to other obligations.

2.  Hotel checkout was strictly enforced and was at 11 AM the following morning.  What was everyone going to do with 8 hours of wait time?

As the day went on, the ship’s wedding planner did continue to call and update with information.  I expressed my concern to her that our best man was going to have to miss the reception, to which she responded that there was nothing that could be done.  She was not responsible for the ship’s delay.  I also asked her if she had any advice as far as what to do with 40 people who were needing somewhere to go for an additional 6 hours of wait time.  She didn’t have a suggestion for that either.

In the end, the hotel was more than generous and extended check out until 2 PM.  At that point, we all gathered in the lobby, guests dressed in their wedding attire, and played cards and enjoyed each other’s company.  I cried when 5 guests, including our best man, got into a taxi headed to the airport at 2 PM.  The tickets could not be changed, and the ship was not willing to work with us on rebooking the flights or any other sort of compensation.  (My husband and I spent 3 hours on the phone the previous day trying to find a solution.)

We made it to the port, and it was a beautiful day.  The ship allowed up to 3 weddings on the boat, and the wedding planner was running around like crazy because she was responsible for ALL 3 weddings that were going to happen at 7 PM that evening, all in different locations on the huge ship!  She greeted me (This was the first time we had met.), tried to console me when I became upset about the 5 people that had headed to the airport, then rushed off to the next bridal party.

We boarded the boat at 5:30 PM and were given two rooms–the men in one, the ladies in the other, to get dressed.  The tuxedos were in my room, by mistake, so my maid of honor traveled the corridors of the ship looking for the men’s room so they could get dressed.  One shoe had not been packed into the tuxedo rental, and no one had caught the mistake.  Little did I know at the time (thank goodness), that the men were in their rooms going through luggage trying to find a pair of shoes that would work as a substitute.

Thinking we had 1.5 hours until our wedding, the ladies were taking our time.  My sister had gone to get me a plate of food, because I was starving, when all of a sudden, the wedding planner knocked on my cabin door and said, “The captain has informed us he needs to set sail, the wedding will now be at 6 PM.  You have 15 minutes.”  I was FLOORED.  My makeup wasn’t done, I was hot and sweaty from sitting in the Tampa heat waiting to board the ship, and I needed a few minutes to decompress in the air conditioner and grab a bite to eat.  I sponged off quickly, put the food aside, and shoved myself into the dress, trying to apply makeup with shaky hands.  At 5:55 PM, the wedding planner came back to the room and said, “I told the captain 6 PM was not feasible for any of the brides, and your wedding time will now be 6:30 PM.”  I remember looking her in the face and saying, “Please do not come back to this room until 6:25 PM to get me and walk me to the location”, and I politely shut the door.

In the end, our wedding was beautiful.  Yes, we were rushed and frazzled and had to adapt to changing plans that we could not control.  And yes some of our friends had to fly home early. And the chain of events leading up to the wedding has certainly left us with many unique memories we can now laugh about.  Despite all of these mishaps, we had a wonderful time sailing the seas for 7 days with our closest friends and family.

Why did all these things happen?  I had a wedding planner right?  Well, not exactly,  The cruise ship had a wedding planner.  I learned a big lesson this day in the world of wedding and event planning:  If you want a calm and stress free event, it is best to hire your OWN wedding planner, because the wedding planner at the venue doesn’t have your best interests, concerns, or needs in mind.  If only I had known this before…

M. Shannon Hernandez, owner and designer of Sage & Time Designs, is a stationery designer in Brooklyn, New York.  She works closely with clients and event planners across the United States to design handcrafted and custom stationery for their personal and social lives.  All products are handcrafted and designed specifically for each client, ensuring truly unique and customized products which help set the tone for the important events in our lives.  You can learn more about Shannon on the Sage & Time Designs blog, on Facebook at Sage & Time Designs, and Twitter @SageTimeDesigns.